CCNAv7: ENSA

Categories

CCNA

 

Enterprise Networking, Security, and Automation Course

Welcome to the final course of the Cisco Networking Academy CCNAv7 curriculum, Enterprise Networking, Security, and Automation (ENSA). This is the third of three courses that are aligned to the CCNA Certification Exam. ENSA contains 14 modules, each with a series of topics.

In Enterprise Networking, Security, and Automation, you will take the skills and knowledge that you learned in ITN and SWRE and apply them to wide area networks (WANs). WANs are large, complex networks that require advanced understanding of network operation and security. ENSA also introduces you to two game-changing areas of networking: virtualization and automation.

By the end of this course you will be able to configure, troubleshoot, and secure enterprise network devices. You will be versed in application programming interfaces (APIs) and the configuration management tools that make network automation possible.

When you have completed ENSA, you will have gained the practical experience you need to prepare for the certification exam. You will also have the skills required for associate-level roles in the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) industry.

Let Cisco Networking Academy help you get where you want to go!

Course Otutline:

1 – Single-Area OSPFv2 Concepts
1.0 – Introduction
1.0.1 – Why should I take this module?t
1.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

1.1 – OSPF Features and Characteristics
1.1.1 – Introduction to OSPF
1.1.2 – Components of OSPF
1.1.3 – Link-State Operation
1.1.4 – Single-Area and Multiarea OSPF
1.1.5 – Multiarea OSPF
1.1.6 – OSPFv3

1.2 – OSPF Packets
1.2.1 – Video – OSPF Packets
1.2.2 – Types of OSPF Packets
1.2.3 – Link-State Updates
1.2.4 – Hello Packet
1.2.5 – Check Your Understanding – OSPF Packets

1.3 – OSPF Operation
1.3.1 – Video – OSPF Operation
1.3.2 – OSPF Operational States
1.3.3 – Establish Neighbor Adjacencies
1.3.4 – Synchronizing OSPF Databases
1.3.5 – The Need for a DR
1.3.6 – LSA Flooding With a DR
1.3.7 – Check Your Understanding – OSPF Operation

2 – Single-Area OSPFv2 Configuration

2.0 – Introduction
2.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
2.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

2.1 – OSPF Router ID
2.1.1 – OSPF Reference Topology
2.1.2 – Router Configuration Mode for OSPF
2.1.3 – Router IDs
2.1.4 – Router ID Order of Precedence
2.1.5 – Configure a Loopback Interface as the Router ID
2.1.6 – Explicitly Configure a Router ID
2.1.7 – Modify a Router ID

2.2 – Point-to-Point OSPF Networks
2.2.1 – The network Command Syntax
2.2.2 – The Wildcard Mask
2.2.3 – Check Your Understanding – The Wildcard Masks
2.2.4 – Configure OSPF Using the network Command
2.2.5 – Syntax Checker – Configure R2 and R3 Using the network Command
2.2.6 – Configure OSPF Using the ip ospf Command
2.2.7 – Syntax Checker – Configure R2 and R3 Using the ip ospf Command
2.2.8 – Passive Interface
2.2.9 – Configure Passive Interfaces
2.2.10 – Syntax Checker – Configure R2 and R3 Passive Interfaces
2.2.11 – OSPF Point-to-Point Networks
2.2.12 – Loopbacks and Point-to-Point Networks

2.3 – Multiaccess OSPF Networks
2.3.1 – OSPF Network Types
2.3.2 – OSPF Designated Router
2.3.3 – OSPF Multiaccess Reference Topology
2.3.4 – Verify OSPF Router Roles
2.3.5 – Verify DR/BDR Adjacencies
2.3.6 – Default DR/BDR Election Process
2.3.7 – DR Failure and Recovery
2.3.8 – The ip ospf priority Command
2.3.9 – Configure OSPF Priority

2.4 – Modify Single-Area OSPFv2
2.4.1 – Cisco OSPF Cost Metric
2.4.2 – Adjust the Reference Bandwidth
2.4.3 – OSPF Accumulates Costs
2.4.4 – Manually Set OSPF Cost Value
2.4.5 – Test Failover to Backup Route
2.4.6 – Syntax Checker – Modify the Cost Values for R2 and R3
2.4.7 – Hello Packet Intervals
2.4.8 – Verify Hello and Dead Intervals
2.4.9 – Modify OSPFv2 Intervals

2.5 – Default Route Propagation
2.5.1 – Propagate a Default Static Route in OSPFv2
2.5.2 – Verify the Propagated Default Route

2.6 – Verify Single-Area OSPFv2
2.6.1 – Verify OSPF Neighbors
2.6.2 – Verify OSPF Protocol Settings
2.6.3 – Verify OSPF Process Information
2.6.4 – Verify OSPF Interface Settings

3 – Network Security Concepts

3.0 – Introduction
3.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
3.0.2 – What will I learn in this module?
3.0.3 – Ethical Hacking Statement

3.1 – Current State of Cybersecurity
3.1.1 – Current State of Affairs
3.1.2 – Vectors of Network Attacks
3.1.3 – Data Loss
3.1.4 – Check Your Understanding – Current State of Cybersecurity

3.2 – Threat Actors
3.2.1 – The Hacker
3.2.2 – Evolution of Hackers
3.2.3 – Cyber Criminals
3.2.4 – Hacktivists
3.2.5 – State-Sponsored Hackers

3.3 – Threat Actor Tools
3.3.1 – Video – Threat Actor Tools
3.3.2 – Introduction to Attack Tools
3.3.3 – Evolution of Security Tools
3.3.4 – Attack Types

3.4 – Malware
3.4.1 – Overview of Malware
3.4.2 – Viruses and Trojan Horses
3.4.3 – Other Types of Malware

3.5 – Common Network Attacks
3.5.1 – Overview of Network Attacks
3.5.2 – Video – Reconnaissance Attacks
3.5.3 – Reconnaissance Attacks
3.5.4 – Video – Access and Social Engineering Attacks
3.5.5 – Access Attacks
3.5.6 – Social Engineering Attacks
3.5.7 – Lab – Social Engineering
3.5.8 – Video – Denial of Service Attacks
3.5.9 – DoS and DDoS Attacks

3.6 – IP Vulnerabilities and Threats
3.6.1 – Video – Common IP and ICMP Attacks
3.6.2 – IPv4 and IPv6
3.6.3 – ICMP Attacks
3.6.4 – Video – Amplification, Reflection, and Spoofing Attacks
3.6.5 – Amplification and Reflection Attacks
3.6.6 – Address Spoofing Attacks

3.7 – TCP and UDP Vulnerabilities
3.7.1 – TCP Segment Header
3.7.2 – TCP Services
3.7.3 – TCP Attacks
3.7.4 – UDP Segment Header and Operation
3.7.5 – UDP Attacks

3.8 – IP Services
3.8.1 – ARP Vulnerabilities
3.8.2 – ARP Cache Poisoning
3.8.3 – Video – ARP Spoofing
3.8.4 – DNS Attacks
3.8.5 – DNS Tunneling
3.8.6 – DHCP
3.8.7 – DHCP Attacks

3.9 – Network Security Best Practices
3.9.1 – Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability
3.9.2 – The Defense-in-Depth Approach
3.9.3 – Firewalls
3.9.4 – IPS
3.9.5 – Content Security Appliances

3.10 – Cryptography
3.10.1 – Video – Cryptography
3.10.2 – Securing Communications
3.10.3 – Data Integrity
3.10.4 – Hash Functions
3.10.5 – Origin Authentication
3.10.6 – Data Confidentiality
3.10.7 – Symmetric Encryption
3.10.8 – Asymmetric Encryption
3.10.9 – Diffie-Hellman

4 – ACL Concepts

4.0 – Introduction
4.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
4.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

4.1 – Purpose of ACLs
4.1.1 – What is an ACL?
4.1.2 – Packet Filtering
4.1.3 – ACL Operation
4.1.4 – Packet Tracer – ACL Demonstration

4.2 – Wildcard Masks in ACLs
4.2.1 – Wildcard Mask Overviewt
4.2.2 – Wildcard Mask Types
4.2.3 – Wildcard Mask Calculation
4.2.4 – Wildcard Mask Keywords

4.3 – Guidelines for ACL Creation
4.3.1 – Limited Number of ACLs per Interface
4.3.2 – ACL Best Practices

4.4 – Types of IPv4 ACLs
4.4.1 – Standard and Extended ACLs
4.4.2 – Numbered and Named ACLs
4.4.3 – Where to Place ACLs
4.4.4 – Standard ACL Placement Example
4.4.5 – Extended ACL Placement Example

4.5 – Module Practice and Quiz
4.5.1 – What did I learn in this module?

5 – ACLs for IPv4 Configuration

5.0 – Introduction
5.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
5.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

5.1 – Configure Standard IPv4 ACLs
5.1.1 – Create an ACL
5.1.2 – Numbered Standard IPv4 ACL Syntax
5.1.3 – Named Standard IPv4 ACL Syntax
5.1.4 – Apply a Standard IPv4 ACL
5.1.5 – Numbered Standard IPv4 ACL Example
5.1.6 – Named Standard IPv4 ACL Example

5.2 – Modify IPv4 ACLs
5.2.1 – Two Methods to Modify an ACL
5.2.2 – Text Editor Method
5.2.3 – Sequence Numbers Method
5.2.4 – Modify a Named ACL Example
5.2.5 – ACL Statistics

5.3 – Secure VTY Ports with a Standard IPv4 ACL
5.3.1 – The access-class Command
5.3.2 – Secure VTY Access Example
5.3.3 – Verify the VTY Port is Secured

5.4 – Configure Extended IPv4 ACLs
5.4.1 – Extended ACLs
5.4.2 – Numbered Extended IPv4 ACL Syntax
5.4.4 – Protocols and Port Numbers Configuration Examples
5.4.5 – Apply a Numbered Extended IPv4 ACL
5.4.6 – TCP Established Extended ACL
5.4.7 – Named Extended IPv4 ACL Syntax
5.4.8 – Named Extended IPv4 ACL Example
5.4.9 – Edit Extended ACLs
5.4.10 – Another Named Extended IPv4 ACL Example
5.4.11 – Verify Extended ACLs

6 – NAT for IPv4

6.0 – Introduction
6.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
6.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

6.1 – NAT Characteristics
6.1.1 – IPv4 Private Address Space
6.1.2 – What is NAT
6.1.3 – How NAT Works
6.1.4 – NAT Terminology

6.2 – Types of NAT
6.2.1 – Static NAT
6.2.2 – Dynamic NAT
6.2.3 – Port Address Translation
6.2.4 – Next Available Port
6.2.5 – NAT and PAT Comparison

6.3 – NAT Advantages and Disadvantages
6.3.1 – Advantages of NAT
6.3.2 – Disadvantages of NAT

6.4 – Static NAT
6.4.1 – Static NAT Scenario
6.4.2 – Configure Static NAT
6.4.3 – Analyze Static NAT
6.4.4 – Verify Static NAT

6.5 – Dynamic NAT
6.5.1 – Dynamic NAT Scenario
6.5.2 – Configure Dynamic NAT
6.5.3 – Analyze Dynamic NAT – Inside to Outside
6.5.4 – Analyze Dynamic NAT – Outside to Inside
6.5.5 – Verify Dynamic NAT

6.6 – PAT
6.6.1 – PAT Scenario
6.6.2 – Configure PAT to Use a Single IPv4 Address
6.6.3 – Configure PAT to Use an Address Pool
6.6.4 – Analyze PAT – PC to Server
6.6.5 – Analyze PAT – Server to PC
6.6.6 – Verify PAT

6.7 – NAT64
6.7.1 – NAT for IPv6?
6.7.2 – NAT64

7 – WAN Concepts

7.0 – Introduction
7.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
7.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

7.1 – Purpose of WANs
7.1.1 – LANs and WANs
7.1.2 – Private and Public WANs
7.1.3 – WAN Topologies
7.1.4 – Carrier Connections
7.1.5 – Evolving Networks

7.2 – WAN Operations
7.2.1 – WAN Standards
7.2.2 – WANs in the OSI Model
7.2.3 – Common WAN Terminology
7.2.4 – WAN Devices
7.2.5 – Serial Communication
7.2.6 – Circuit-Switched Communication
7.2.7 – Packet-Switched Communications
7.2.8 – SDH, SONET, and DWDM

7.3 – Traditional WAN Connectivity
7.3.1 – Traditional WAN Connectivity Options
7.3.2 – Common WAN Terminology
7.3.3 – Circuit-Switched Options
7.3.4 – Packet-Switched Options
7.3.5 – Check Your Understanding – Traditional WAN Connectivity

7.4 – Modern WAN Connectivity
7.4.1 – Modern WANs
7.4.2 – Modern WAN Connectivity Options
7.4.3 – Ethernet WAN
7.4.4 – MPLS

7.5 – Internet-Based Connectivity
7.5.1 – Internet-Based Connectivity Options
7.5.2 – DSL Technology
7.5.3 – DSL Connections
7.5.4 – DSL and PPP
7.5.5 – Cable Technology
7.5.6 – Optical Fiber
7.5.7 – Wireless Internet-Based Broadband
7.5.8 – VPN Technology
7.5.10 – Broadband Solution Comparison

7.6 – Module Practice and Quiz
7.6.1 – Packet Tracer – WAN Concepts
7.6.2 – What did I learn in this module?
7.6.3 – Module Quiz – WAN Concepts

8 – VPN and IPsec Concepts

8.0 – Introduction
8.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
8.0.2 – What will I learn in this module?

8.1 – VPN Technology
8.1.1 – Virtual Private Networks
8.1.2 – VPN Benefits
8.1.3 – Site-to-Site and Remote-Access VPNs
8.1.4 – Enterprise and Service Provider VPNs
8.1.5 – Check Your Understanding – VPN Technology

8.2 – Types of VPNs
8.2.1 – Remote-Access VPNs
8.2.2 – SSL VPNs
8.2.3 – Site-to-Site IPsec VPNs
8.2.4 – GRE over IPsec
8.2.5 – Dynamic Multipoint VPNs
8.2.6 – IPsec Virtual Tunnel Interface
8.2.7 – Service Provider MPLS VPNs

8.3 – IPsec
8.3.1 – Video – IPsec Concepts
8.3.2 – IPsec Technologies
8.3.3 – IPsec Protocol Encapsulation
8.3.4 – Confidentiality
8.3.5 – Integrity
8.3.6 – Authentication
8.3.7 – Secure Key Exchange with Diffie-Hellman
8.3.8 – Video – IPsec Transport and Tunnel Mode

9 – QoS Concepts

9.0 – Introduction
9.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
9.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

9.1 – Network Transmission Quality
9.1.1 – Video Tutorial – The Purpose of QoS
9.1.2 – Prioritizing Traffic
9.1.3 – Bandwidth, Congestion, Delay, and Jitter
9.1.4 – Packet Loss
9.1.5 – Check Your Understanding – Network Transmission Quality

9.2 – Traffic Characteristics
9.2.1 – Video Tutorial – Traffic Characteristics
9.2.2 – Network Traffic Trends
9.2.3 – Voice
9.2.4 – Video
9.2.5 – Datat

9.3 – Queuing Algorithms
9.3.1 – Video Tutorial – QoS Algorithms
9.3.2 – Queuing Overview
9.3.3 – First In First Out
9.3.4 – Weighted Fair Queuing (WFQ)
9.3.5 – Class-Based Weighted Fair Queuing (CBWFQ)
9.3.6 – Low Latency Queuing (LLQ)

9.4 – QoS Models
9.4.1 – Video Tutorial – QoS Models
9.4.2 – Selecting an Appropriate QoS Policy Model
9.4.3 – Best Effort
9.4.4 – Integrated Services
9.4.5 – Differentiated Services

9.6 – Module Practice and Quiz
9.6.1 – What did I learn in this module?Contains: Text
9.6.2 – Module Quiz – QoS Concepts

10 – Network Management

10.0 – Introduction
10.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
10.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

10.1 – Device Discovery with CDP
10.1.1 – CDP Overview
10.1.2 – Configure and Verify CDP
10.1.3 – Discover Devices by Using CDP
10.1.4 – Syntax Checker – Configure and Verify CDP
10.1.5 – Packet Tracer – Use CDP to Map a Network

10.2 – Device Discovery with LLDP
10.2.1 – LLDP Overview
10.2.2 – Configure and Verify LLDP
10.2.3 – Discover Devices by Using LLDP

10.3 – NTP
10.3.1 – Time and Calendar Services
10.3.2 – NTP Operation
10.3.3 – Configure and Verify NTP

10.4 – SNMP
10.4.1 – Introduction to SNMP
10.4.2 – SNMP Operation
10.4.3 – SNMP Agent Traps
10.4.4 – SNMP Versions
10.4.6 – Community Strings
10.4.7 – MIB Object ID
10.4.8 – SNMP Polling Scenario
10.4.9 – SNMP Object Navigator

10.5 – Syslog
10.5.1 – Introduction to Syslog
10.5.2 – Syslog Operation
10.5.3 – Syslog Message Format
10.5.4 – Syslog Facilities
10.5.5 – Configure Syslog Timestamp

10.6 – Router and Switch File Maintenance
10.6.1 – Router File Systems
10.6.2 – Switch File Systems
10.6.3 – Use a Text File to Back Up a Configuration
10.6.4 – Use a Text File to Restore a Configuration
10.6.5 – Use TFTP to Back Up and Restore a Configuration
10.6.6 – USB Ports on a Cisco Router
10.6.7 – Use USB to Back Up and Restore a Configuration
10.6.8 – Password Recovery Procedures

10.7 – IOS Image Management
10.7.1 – Video – Managing Cisco IOS Images
10.7.2 – TFTP Servers as a Backup Location
10.7.3 – Backup IOS Image to TFTP Server Example
10.7.4 – Copy an IOS Image to a Device Example
10.7.5 – The boot system Command

10.8 – Module Practice and Quiz
10.8.3 – What did I learn in this module?
10.8.4 – Module Quiz – Network Management

11 – Network Design

11.0 – Introduction
11.0.1 – Why should I take this module?Contains: Text
11.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?Contains: Text

11.1 – Hierarchical Networks
11.1.1 – Video – Three-Layer Network Design
11.1.2 – The Need to Scale the Network
11.1.3 – Borderless Switched Networks
11.1.4 – Hierarchy in the Borderless Switched Network
11.1.5 – Access, Distribution, and Core Layer Functions
11.1.7 – Role of Switched Networks

11.2 – Scalable Networks
11.2.1 – Design for Scalability
11.2.2 – Plan for Redundancy
11.2.3 – Reduce Failure Domain Size
11.2.4 – Increase Bandwidth
11.2.5 – Expand the Access Layer
11.2.6 – Tune Routing Protocols
11.2.7 – Check Your Understanding – Scalable Networks

11.3 – Switch Hardware
11.3.1 – Switch Platforms
11.3.2 – Switch Form Factors
11.3.3 – Port Density
11.3.4 – Forwarding Rates
11.3.5 – Power over Ethernet
11.3.6 – Multilayer Switching
11.3.7 – Business Considerations for Switch Selection
11.3.8 – Check Your Understanding – Switch Hardware

11.4 – Router Hardware
11.4.1 – Router Requirements
11.4.2 – Cisco Routers
11.4.3 – Router Form Factors

12 – Network Troubleshooting

12.0 – Introduction
12.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
12.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?

12.1 – Network Documentation
12.1.1 – Documentation Overview
12.1.2 – Network Topology Diagrams
12.1.3 – Network Device Documentation
12.1.4 – Establish a Network Baseline
12.1.5 – Step 1 – Determine What Types of Data to Collect
12.1.6 – Step 2 – Identify Devices and Ports of Interest
12.1.7 – Step 3 – Determine the Baseline Duration
12.1.8 – Data Measurement

12.2 – Troubleshooting Process
12.2.1 – General Troubleshooting Procedures
12.2.2 – Seven-Step Troubleshooting Process
12.2.3 – Question End Users
12.2.4 – Gather Information
12.2.5 – Troubleshooting with Layered Models
12.2.6 – Structured Troubleshooting Methods
12.2.7 – Guidelines for Selecting a Troubleshooting Method

12.3 – Troubleshooting Tools
12.3.1 – Software Troubleshooting Tools
12.3.2 – Protocol Analyzers
12.3.3 – Hardware Troubleshooting Tools
12.3.4 – Syslog Server as a Troubleshooting Tool
12.3.5 – Check Your Understanding – Troubleshooting Tools

12.4 – Symptoms and Causes of Network Problems
12.4.1 – Physical Layer Troubleshooting
12.4.2 – Data Link Layer Troubleshooting
12.4.3 – Network Layer Troubleshooting
12.4.4 – Transport Layer Troubleshooting – ACLs
12.4.5 – Transport Layer Troubleshooting – NAT for IPv4
12.4.6 – Application Layer Troubleshooting

12.5 – Troubleshooting IP Connectivity
12.5.1 – Components of Troubleshooting End-to-End Connectivity
12.5.2 – End-to-End Connectivity Problem Initiates Troubleshooting
12.5.3 – Step 1 – Verify the Physical Layer
12.5.4 – Step 2 – Check for Duplex Mismatches
12.5.5 – Step 3 – Verify Addressing on the Local Network
12.5.6 – Troubleshoot VLAN Assignment Example
12.5.7 – Step 4 – Verify Default Gateway
12.5.8 – Troubleshoot IPv6 Default Gateway Example
12.5.9 – Step 5 – Verify Correct Path
12.5.10 – Step 6 – Verify the Transport Layer
12.5.11 – Step 7 – Verify ACLs
12.5.12 – Step 8 – Verify DNS

13 – Network Virtualization

13.0 – Introduction
13.0.1 – Why should I take this module?Contains: Text
13.0.2 – What will I learn to do in this module?Contains: Text

13.1 – Cloud Computing
13.1.1 – Video – Cloud and VirtualizationContains: Text, Videos
13.1.2 – Cloud OverviewContains: Text
13.1.3 – Cloud Services
13.1.4 – Cloud Models
13.1.5 – Cloud Computing versus Data Center

13.2 – Virtualization
13.2.1 – Cloud Computing and Virtualization
13.2.2 – Dedicated Servers
13.2.3 – Server Virtualization
13.2.4 – Advantages of Virtualization
13.2.5 – Abstraction Layers
13.2.6 – Type 2 Hypervisors

13.3 – Virtual Network Infrastructure
13.3.1 – Type 1 Hypervisors
13.3.2 – Installing a VM on a Hypervisor
13.3.3 – The Complexity of Network Virtualization

13.4 – Software-Defined Networking
13.4.1 – Video – Software-Defined Networking
13.4.2 – Control Plane and Data Plane
13.4.3 – Network Virtualization Technologies
13.4.4 – Traditional and SDN Architectures

13.5 – Controllers
13.5.1 – SDN Controller and Operations
13.5.2 – Video – Cisco ACI
13.5.3 – Core Components of ACI
13.5.4 – Spine-Leaf Topology
13.5.5 – SDN Types
13.5.6 – APIC-EM Features
13.5.7 – APIC-EM Path Trace

14 – Network Automation

14.0 – Introduction
14.0.1 – Why should I take this module?
14.0.2 – What will I learn in this module?

14.1 – Automation Overview
14.1.1 – Video – Automation Everywhere
14.1.2 – The Increase in Automation
14.1.3 – Thinking Devices

14.2 – Data Formats
14.2.1 – Video – Data Formats
14.2.2 – The Data Formats Concept
14.2.3 – Data Format Rules
14.2.4 – Compare Data Formats
14.2.5 – JSON Data Format
14.2.6 – JSON Syntax Rules
14.2.7 – YAML Data Format
14.2.8 – XML Data Format
14.2.9 – Check Your Understanding – Data Formats

14.3 – APIs
14.3.1 – Video – APIs
14.3.2 – The API Concept
14.3.3 – An API Example
14.3.4 – Open, Internal, and Partner APIs
14.3.5 – Types of Web Service APIs
14.3.6 – Check Your Understanding – APIs

14.4 – REST
14.4.1 – Video – REST
14.4.2 – REST and RESTful API
14.4.3 – RESTful Implementation
14.4.4 – URI, URN, and URL
14.4.5 – Anatomy of a RESTful Request
14.4.6 – RESTful API Applications
14.4.7 – Check Your Understanding – REST

14.5 – Configuration Management Tools
14.5.1 – Video – Configuration Management Tools
14.5.2 – Traditional Network Configuration
14.5.3 – Network Automation
14.5.4 – Configuration Management Tools
14.5.5 – Compare Ansible, Chef, Puppet, and SaltStack

14.6 – IBN and Cisco DNA Center
14.6.1 – Video – Intent-Based Networking
14.6.2 – Intent-Based Networking Overview
14.6.3 – Network Infrastructure as Fabric
14.6.4 – Cisco Digital Network Architecture (DNA)
14.6.5 – Cisco DNA Center
14.6.6 – Video – DNA Center Overview and Platform APIs
14.6.7 – Video – DNA Center Design and Provision
14.6.8 – Video – DNA Center Policy and Assurance
14.6.9 – Video – DNA Center Troubleshooting User Connectivity